Writers and Editors (Pat McNees's blog)
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The truth about book sales and authors' income

September 20, 2015

Tags: books sales, marketing

Warning: The news is not good but this is just a sampling. "Only 39% of authors supported themselves exclusively through writing-related work," according to The Wages of Writing: Key Findings from the Authors Guild 2015 member survey. Author incomes are down, hybrid authorship is up, and authors are spending more time marketing than ever before. (Hybrid authorship is the practice of self-publishing while also being traditionally published.) Authors spend more time on marketing, less on writing books. Traditional publishersí promotional budgets have all but dried up, (more…)

Open Sky turns bloggers into a sales force

October 1, 2010

Tags: blogs, marketing

Erick Schonfeld wrote about Open Sky for TechCrunch in April in Launch: OpenSky Wants To Turn Bloggers Into Sellers Without Sacrificing Their Souls. "While OpenSky sounds at first like an affiliate network, it isní (more…)

Your elevator speech

May 19, 2010

Tags: elevator speech, marketing

Marcia Yudkin suggests this template for your elevator speech: "I specialize in helping ___ (who?) who have ___ (what problem?) get ___ (what result?)" (from (Marcia's Mantras, a nanozine) This echoes a theme in Roar! Get Heard in the Sales and Marketing Jungle: A Business Fable (more…)

The difference between marketing, publicity, and advertising

June 3, 2009

Tags: marketing, John Kremer

In an excellent audio interview on the Great Writers Book Marketing Series, John Kremer (author of 1001 Ways to Market Your Books)-- get the Sixth Edition) explains the difference between publicity, advertising, and marketing. Publicity is getting some form of media to do a story about you. (You may have to pay someone to help you (more…)

Jonathan Karp puts authors center front in 12 Steps to Better Book Publishing

April 21, 2009

Tags: book publishing, authors, marketing, editing, publishing process

"We all like to believe we are essential to a book's success, but the truth is, we are a marginal factor. The author, and the book, matter most, followed by the media, booksellers and readers. We're facilitators. The most important decisions we make are at the acquisition and positioning stages. That's where sales and (more…)