instagram pinterest linkedin facebook twitter goodreads facebook circle twitter circle linkedin circle instagram circle goodreads circle pinterest circle

Writers and Editors (Pat McNees's blog) RSS feed

Who owns an interview? Who controls the right to use it?

by Pat McNees
Who owns (or is assumed to own) the copyright in an interview seems to vary among professions (say, journalists and oral historians) and sometimes those doing the interviewing seem to be taking too much advantage of the people they are interviewing.  Read More 

Post a comment

The Hubbub About Sci-Hub: Who's the real pirate?

Updated 7-11-17, 4-13-17. Welcome to Sci-Hub, the Pirate Bay of science. "A researcher in Russia [ Alexandra Elbakyan} made more than 48 million journal articles -- almost every single peer-reviewed paper ever published -- freely available online. And she refused to shut the site down, despite a court injunction and a lawsuit from Elsevier, one of the world's biggest  Read More 
1 Comments
Post a comment

The Panama Papers: Exposing the rogue offshore money maze

filed by Pat McNees

The Panama Papers: Politicians, Criminals, and the Rogue Industry That Hides Their Cash


Panama Papers: Exposing the Rogue Offshore Finance Industry (International Consortium of Investigative Journalism) Giant leak of offshore financial records exposes global array of crime and corruption. Millions of documents show heads of state, criminals and celebrities using secret hideaways in tax havens. Brilliant coverage by the  Read More 
1 Comments
Post a comment

Voice in memoirs

People who talk about "voice in memoir" aren't always talking about the same thing.
Sue William Silverman writes "In short, the Voice of Innocence conveys what happened: 'I press the scarf to my face, inhaling autumn dusk.' It leads the reader through the actual surface event. The Voice of Experience, on the other hand, examines what the author, sitting at her desk, writing, understands about events now Read More 
Be the first to comment

Ever wondered about those TED talks and conferences?

Watching a TED talk online, I noticed that most of the audience appeared to be well-groomed men, so I looked for explanations of who gets invited and how and why TED gatherings work. Liked what Jacob Ward of Popular Science had to say: I Didn't Like TED. Then I Got It (3-1-16) "It launched in 1984 as a conference around Technology, Entertainment and Design, and has grown to include not just its two annual events  Read More 
Be the first to comment

Bill Wurtz's fabulous speedy history of Japan

The entire history of Japan (40,000 years) told quickly, visually, fabulously, and in a way you want to see again. Bill Wurtz, you are a genius.






Post a comment

Preserving original documents

by Taylor Whitney

Photographs (and paper documents) suffer from inherent chemical deterioration, generally exhibited by fading (called "chemical fade"). Fluctuations in temperature and humidity accelerate that deterioration process; that's why storage is such an important conversation to have.

Most "cultural collections" (business archives, household, social clubs and institutions such as nonprofit organizations) are stored in acidic  Read More 
1 Comments
Post a comment

Amazon vs Book Publishers (Do Writers Win or Lose?) Updated 1-24-16

Published initially 11/14/2014; updated 9-4-19.
A lot has changed in book publishing in the last ten years (Mike Shatzkin, Shatzkin Files, 7-23-19) "At the beginning of this decade, Amazon Publishing had ideas about signing up big authors. But they were stymied then by the pretty stubborn refusal of the rest of the supply chain to stock books published by their biggest retail competitor.
"But that was when Amazon sales were about 20-25 percent of the market. Now they’re probably over half, and well above that for many books. Whether they will successfully sell Koontz beyond Amazon remains to be seen, but their no-middleperson structure enables them to pay far more of each retail dollar in royalties, so half the sales or more can generate more income to the author than a publisher without its own retailing capability can deliver selling a larger number of units. If this is a sign of things to come, and it is hard to see why it wouldn’t be, some profound changes might be just around the corner."
The Week’s Big Story: Amazon Publishing on Wooing Dean Koontz (Porter Anderson, Publishing Perspectives, 7-26-19)
Amazon To Open Hundreds Of Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores (Pavithra Mohan, Fast Company, 2-2-16) Amazon, the online retailer that killed off so many independent bookshops, is getting ready to launch its own brick-and-mortar book chain. According to the Wall Street Journal, the CEO of a major mall operator, General Growth Properties, revealed on Tuesday that Amazon intends to launch hundreds of bookstores.
Why Amazon's Rumored "Bookstores" Probably Won't Be What You Think (Rich Bellis, Fast Company, 2-3-16) If Amazon does expand its physical retail footprint, don’t expect it to focus exclusively or even primarily on books. It may see physical locations as (among other things) more akin to Apple Stores, where it can showcase the hardware it sells online.
Meet the Guy Behind Amazon’s Secret Retail Store Plans (Jason Del Rey, re/code, 2-3-16) The man behind the Kindle is leading Amazon’s project to create the retail stores of the future. And bookstores are just the beginning. These are two of the new details Re/code has uncovered about Amazon’s plans for expansion into physical retail.
Amazon Plans Hundreds of Brick-and-Mortar Bookstores, Mall CEO Says (Greg Bensinger, WSJ, 2-2-16) mazon Plans Hundreds of Brick-and-Mortar Bookstores, Mall CEO Says

In the following pieces about a dispute among them, Amazon and book publishers take turns being the bad guy. Authors, read these often excellent arguments for and against book publishers, Amazon, and others engaged in this battle for market power and tell us what you think!  Read More 

8 Comments
Post a comment

Working with Offset Printers

This guest post is by Robin Brooks, a book designer who not only does beautiful book and website design but also explains clearly the practical aspects of working with an offset printer. She shared the following tips on the Association of Personal Historians listserv; they were so helpful I asked permission to post them here. Generally you won't use an offset printer unless you are printing at least 500 copies of a book. Then I always hire a book designer for reasons Robin's post makes clear. Read More 
Post a comment

Revolution in academia: Copyright and open access

(updated 1-29-17, 3-5-16, 3-19-16)
In academia a wide-ranging discussion about open access is weakening academic journals' monopoly on profiting from publishing research findings. Different interest groups view this differently, of course. Meanwhile, as the publishing landscape changes, are academic authors, who have long abandoned claims to copyright on many of their scholarly articles (in the "public or perish" world of university faculty-making), less docile about publishing rights, with tenured faculty positions scarcer and scarcer? This round-up of relevant pieces starts with

Elsevier Mutiny: Cracks Are Widening in the Fortress of Academic Publishing (Mathew Ingram, Forbes, 11-2-15) "All six editors and the entire editorial board of the well-respected linguistics journal Lingua have resigned to protest the company’s failure to embrace open access.  Read More 
4 Comments
Post a comment