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Link journalism, Google's power on the Web, and the backlash against URL shortening

April 13, 2009

Tags: link journalism, Google, URL shortening

Nicholas Carr's Rough Cuts piece, Google in the Middle -- about how, as a news aggregator, Google capitalizes on the fragmented oversupply of news and the current structure of the news business -- is part of a fascinating online dialogue about the future of Web journalism. Go next to Scott Karp's pieces, on Publishing 2.0: How Google Stole Control Over Content Distribution By Stealing Links ("Google isn't stealing content from newspapers and other media companies. It's stealing their control over distribution" 4-10-09) and Mainstream News Organizations Entering the Webís Link Economy Will Shift the Balance of Power and Wealth (10-16-08).

As Karp points out in his April piece, the backlash against URL shorteners (see Joshua Schacter's blog on url shortenders) and site framing (see Joshua Topolsky on Why Engadget is blocking the DiggBar) "is all about who controls the links, and which links Google is going to read and credit."

We'll no doubt be seeing more stories like this one by Nicholas Kolakowski, on Publish: AP, Google Deny Conflict, But Bloggers May be in Sights. Sue Russell referred us to this excellent related batch of stories.

Comments

  1. July 23, 2009 11:05 AM EDT
    More interesting stories on this topic: Scott Karp on How Networked Link Journalism Can Give Journalists Collectively The Power Of Google And Digg, Mindy McAdams on Link journalism: Credibility and authority), Jack Lail in Link journalist , Josh Catone,ReadWriteWeb asking Link Journalism: Is Linking to News a form of journalism?, and Catone refers to the Public Editor piece in the NY Times, by Clark Hoyt: What That McCain Article Didnít Say .
    - PM